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5 valid reasons why a prenup can simplify a divorce

No one goes into a marriage hoping that it will not last. Unfortunately, though, almost half of all marriages will end in a divorce. It may only be prudent to hope for the best while planning for the worst. Many Maryland residents may have been relieved that they had a prenuptial agreement drafted before they exchanged their vows.

There are several reasons why it may be beneficial to a couple to have a contingency plan in the event that marital bliss does not last. For all of the reasons why a a couple should have a prenup, many can be summed up into five main points. The first reason is that it gives the couple an opportunity to discuss all of the possible outcomes in the event they divorce or one dies. A second reason would be if one or the other partner is in a better financial position. In this situation, a divorce could potentially reduce one's wealth to half or less.

Conversely, if one spouse remained in the home for several years, a reliable source of income could allow him or her to re-enter the workforce after proper preparation. Another reason to have a written plan would be if one partner were to accumulate numerous debts. A prenup could ensure that the other spouse was not financially liable for the debt. A fourth point would be to preserve a business. The fifth reason would be to provide for any children regarding inheritance or other considerations.

There are other scenarios that could justify the need for entering into a prenuptial agreement. In the end, it seeks to ensure that a couple enters into a marriage with their eyes open to potential pitfalls in the event of a divorce. Maryland residents who need information concerning a prenup, divorce or other family law matter can consult with an experienced attorney.

Source: mediate.com, "Happy Valentine's Day Darling; Here's a prenup", Rachel Ryan, Accessed on Feb. 10, 2017

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